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The two main types of Mansard roofs can include the double pitch and the steep sides style roofs. The upper slope of the roof is rarely something that can be seen from the ground. Mansard roof formations often produce an original pitch that can only be seen from a neighbouring building.

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The two main types of Mansard roofs can include the double pitch and the steep sides style roofs. The upper slope of the roof is rarelysomething that can be seen from the ground. Mansard roof formations often produce an original pitch that can only be seen from a neighbouring building.

The main difference between these two roof styles mainly can be seen in the water and snow drainage that are available for each. The longer and sharp style sloped roof will produce better drainage whereas the traditional double pitch can produce reasonable drainage from the low pitch area of the roof.

The steep pitch routes often have a sharp point at the top of the roof that ensures even drainage from all sides, whereas the sloped roof often as a channel or path for water and snow to run off of the roof.


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A mansard or mansard roof (also called a French roof or curb roof) is a four-sided gambrel-style hip roof characterized by two slopes on each of its sides with the lower slope, punctured by dormer windows, at a steeper angle than the upper.[1][2][3] The steep roof with windows creates an additional floor of habitable space[4] (a garret), and reduces the overall height of the roof for a given number of habitable stories. The upper slope of the roof may not be visible from street level when viewed from close proximity to the building.

The earliest known example of a mansard roof is credited to Pierre Lescot on part of the Louvre built around 1550. This roof design was popularized in the early 17th century by François Mansart (1598–1666), an accomplished architect of the French Baroque period.[5] It became especially fashionable during the Second French Empire (1852–1870) of Napoléon III.[6] Mansard in Europe also means the attic (garret) space itself, not just the roof shape[7] and is often used in Europe to mean a gambrel roof.


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